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How to Blog When You Have No Time to Write

Written by Anne McAuley on . Posted in Blogging, Entrepreneur Tips

We each have 24 hours in the day but I have days that feel a lot shorter. I make excuses for not focusing on my own writing projects but it boils down to how I manage my time. To blog when you have no time to write means thinking ahead about what, when, and how you want to organize your content.

Before quitting the idea of creating blog posts for your brand, consider these:

  1. How to Blog When You Have No Time to WriteGet into a Routine. My blogger pal Robbi Hess has been telling me, for way longer than I care to admit, to block time for my own writing. It wasn’t until recently that I made it a priority. Each morning I start my day by writing a blog post for one of my websites. Just that simple act focuses and inspires me to write.
  2. Plan Ahead. Spend time creating a list of blog post ideas that includes links to related articles, notes of what you’d like to include in the post, and a focused theme or category. I am not an outliner but I know bloggers who outline posts as they get ideas, filling in the blanks when they have time to finish. I tend to outline in my head and then start writing. There’s no right way to blog so find what works for you and do that.
  3. 80/20 Rule. 80% of your results come from 20% of your efforts. There’s a large amount of activity that you can delete because it’s not helping your business. If you’re going to coffee meetings with people who aren’t colleagues, masterminds, or prospects, cut those meetings from the schedule. This creates time for blogging.
  4. Create in Batches. Be ahead so you can take time off to spend with family and friends or focus on other business activities like networking or business development. Write a few posts and schedule them to go live over a longer period of time. I recommend four posts a month for most businesses. Write two posts a week for two weeks and a month of blogging is done!
  5. Set Reasonable Goals. I don’t know about you but I am an overachiever that struggles when it comes to goal setting. Take this blog challenge as an example. When it started my goal was 12 blog posts in six days but I soon realized that I only had time for one post. Instead of feeling like a failure, I reset my goal to 12 blog posts in 12 days. This is the fifth of those posts. The lesson? Set reasonable goals for blogging and track results. You might be surprised at what you can achieve.
  6. Hire a Professional Blogger. If you’re overwhelmed at the thought of creating content or have ideas and no time to write, it’s time to hire a professional blogger.

Sometimes 24 hours isn’t enough time to get everything done. That’s where I can help. As a professional blogger, I work with my clients to create content that speaks to their target audience. Contact me via email at anne@annemcauley.com or call 480-206-6452.

For more blogging tips, join the Blogging Badass Facebook Group.

You Need Content to Share on Social Media (and other reasons your business needs a blog)

Written by Anne McAuley on . Posted in Content Marketing

share on social mediaAs business owners we’re often too focused on building business and serving customers to see the value in expanding our digital marketing presence. Social media is effective and grows brand recognition in the community but there’s more to marketing.

You have to create your own content to gain the love of Google, establish yourself as the expert in your industry, and share more than other people’s content on social media.

All too often I hear the concern that blogging and (other content like live streaming, videos, and podcasting) will give away too many secrets about a business but it’s the opposite. You will attract your ideal clients because you’re illustrating you’re knowledgeable about your products and services but that’s not the only reason your business needs a blog. 

Let’s not forget the value of blogging when it comes to search engine optimization (SEO).

Google loves when we add new content.

Don’t create a website and let it sit untouched. The key to being noticed by search engines like Google is to create engaging, relevant content on a regular basis. Blogging is one of the most affordable and efficient ways to add content to your website.

Think of it this way. Each blog post is another page, another way for visitors to find your site.

One blog post a week adds 52 pages to your website every year.

The more frequently you do this, the more likely search engines will visit and rank your site higher in search engine rankings.

Combine consistent, relevant content using keywords and you’ve got a winning combination for your brand.

Establish yourself as the expert.

A mechanic who creates a video of how to change oil in a car isn’t going to lose customers because he shared how to do it. He’s more likely to attract new customers because they see him as the expert. They don’t want to change the oil in their car because they can see how much work it is; they’ll take their car to the mechanic who knows how to change the oil. It’s the same for your business.

If your competitors aren’t creating content, they’re missing an opportunity to grow their business and get noticed (in a good way) by prospective customers. That’s your opportunity to gain a share of the market. Even if they are creating content, it’s not the content you’re creating.

Your brand is unique.

Create content that connects to your target audience. You’re the expert, not your competitor.  

You need content to share on social media.

Think about the content that you’re sharing on social media. It’s probably articles from other experts in your industry that drives readers away from your site. It’s like you’re marketing for the competition. (ouch!) That’s why you need to create your content to drive traffic to your website.

Sharing the content of others is a great way to build community but be picky about what you share and from which sources. Ask yourself these questions before sharing an article on social media:

  • Is this from a reliable source? You might rethink sharing if it’s from a direct competitor.
  • Is this article relevant to my ideal client? If it’s not, don’t share it.
  • Does this article represent my brand voice? Just because it’s a cute kitten and its puppy BFF doesn’t mean you should share it on the social media for your business. It might be better to share on personal social media or not at all.
  • Could I write a better article on the same topic? If you could write a better article, save the link for reference and write your own blog post.

Share your blog posts, videos, podcasts, and links to downloadable content on social media in addition to content from others and those cute cat memes you just can’t stop posting.

How often should you blog? For most businesses, once a week is a reasonable frequency and attainable goal.

If you’re having trouble finding the time to blog, I offer Monthly Blogging Packages. I write on your behalf, telling the story of your brand, so you can focus on your business. Contact me at anne@annemcauley or 480-206-6452 to learn more.

Relevant Articles

Why Your Business Needs a Blog

8 Reasons Why Your Business Needs a Blog

Where to Start Writing Blog Posts When You’re Feeling Overwhelmed

Written by Anne McAuley on . Posted in Blog Post Ideas, Blogging

You’re staring at a list of blog post ideas waiting for the posts to write themselves but they never do. Where do you start writing blog posts when you’re feeling overwhelmed? Sometimes the best thing to do is walk away, do something else, then return with a new approach.

Do anything that gets your mind away from the blank page.

Go for a walk. Play with the dog. Dance.

Start Writing Blog PostsYou will be amazed at what 5-10 minutes away from the screen can do for your creativity and blogger motivation.

Believe me when I say I spend as much time in my backyard pondering as I do writing.

Come back to the list of ideas or the piece you’re writing with new eyes.

Start where you’re comfortable.

Pick a topic from your list that inspires you and write. Some days that’s easier said than done.


There are two ways I approach blog post writing:

  1. Write the middle of the post first. Then a conclusion. Craft the opening last. It’s often easier to write the opening after I’ve gotten all of my ideas out of my head.
  2. Write what I know on the topic. Write from the heart. Research and make notes. Then go back and craft a piece my client will love.

Find your flow. There’s no right way to write.

On my list(s) of blog post ideas, whether for my own writing or for a client, I add notes and relevant links that trigger me when I come back to write. If I have only a topic listed, I don’t always recall why I wanted to write on that topic and it causes a feeling of overwhelm.

I have a list of 100 blog post ideas that gives me anxiety.

I wonder why I haven’t written these posts or how I could, if I wrote them, repurpose them into an ebook, livestream, or guest blog post. My chest is tight just writing about it.

Finally I took the list of 100+ blog post ideas and broke it into a smaller list of 25 ideas. That’s where I got many of my 12 blog post ideas in 30 minutes or less.

12 ideas is less overwhelming than 100 ideas or a blank page with no plan.

When you’re feeling overwhelmed, step away and come back with a new approach. Make your list shorter. Focus on one category rather than a huge list. Write a topic that interests you in the moment.

There’s isn’t a right or wrong way to write your blog posts. Find what works for you and go with the flow to create content that reaches your target audience.

Not sure where to start? Schedule a Getting Started Session today by calling 480-206-6452.

12 Ways to Generate 12 Blog Post Ideas in 30 Minutes or Less

Written by Anne McAuley on . Posted in Blog Post Ideas

When I talk to clients they tell me a version of not having enough time or ideas to write on their business blog. Once we get started, they see their business in a different way.

What are the most common questions asked about you, your business, or your industry? Answering those questions is a great place to start when generating 12 blog post ideas in 30 minutes or less.

Track topics on a spreadsheet. As you add ideas, make notes and add relevant links to which you can refer when you go back and write the post.

blog post ideasAre you ready to get started?

  1. Organize. Before panic sets in, think of three or four topics on which you want to write. My client who is a marketing professional selected social media (general), networking, social media (Facebook and LinkedIn), and marketing plans as her topics. It was easier to fill in three blog post ideas for each topic than a longer list of twelve and she now has a variety of content on her blog.
  2. Old Lists. I don’t know about you but I am list keeper. To do lists, idea lists, spreadsheets for planning events, whatever I am doing that takes more than a couple of steps needs a list. To develop my list of 12 topics, I referred to my old content lists.
  3. Refresh an old post. My blogger pal and image consultant Tabitha Dumas has been refreshing old blog posts as part of her content and social media strategy for the year and her audience is loving it. I am pretty sure Tabitha is loving it too because she’s not having to reinvent the wheel to come up with new topics. She’s refreshing old posts with new ideas and publishing. Change at least 30% and you’re good with Google in terms of duplicate content or just delete the original blog post.   
  4. Newsletters. What’s in your email box? Newsletters aren’t just for reading and adding to the trash. Use the content from thought leaders in your industry as sources for your own blog posts. Jump from, “here’s what so and so wrote,” to give your opinion or tell how your business can help people in that situation.
  5. Google Alerts. I’ve set up Google Alerts for keywords. Then my email sorts it into a designated folder to which I refer when I am stuck for a blog post topic. Thought leader names, companies you follow, and client names are useful alerts.
  6. Google Analytics. Which posts generated the most traffic to your website? Which keywords are people using to find your site? Write those topics and use the keywords again.
  7. Social media. Check social media analytics to see which posts generated the most engagement. Write about those topics again.
  8. FAQ. What do people most ask you about when it comes to your business? Answer their questions in a series of blog posts.
  9. ICYMI. In case you missed it or what you wish people knew about you, your team, or your business. Did you add a new employee? Introduce them in an interview blog post. Did you renovate your office? Show readers pictures and tell about the experience or share how your new office is an improvement on the last.
  10. Community or company events. If you’re involved in the community, tell readers where you’ve served as a volunteer or sponsored an event. This is especially engaging if your business is locally based as opposed to online.
  11. Organize email. Set up email folders where you can easily save emails that you might find useful later. I go to my Content folder when I am struggling for a blog post topic. Not only is this helpful for inspiration, it keeps the inbox clean.
  12. Competitive intelligence. Go to blogs and/or social media of competitors to see what they’re writing. One of my favorites is to search Twitter using relevant search terms and hashtags to see what’s going on in the world of blogging. Do the same for your industry.

Stop making the excuse of not knowing what to blog and start writing!

If you’re still scratching your head at the thought of generating blog post ideas or writing blog posts for your business blog, schedule a Getting Started Session by calling 480-206-6452 or emailing anne@annemcauley.com.

Related Links:

Writer’s Block Tips for Bloggers

Tips for Creating Content People Want to Read

Out of the Box Marketing

Tabitha Dumas Blog  

Why I am Writing 12 Blog Posts in 12 Days

Written by Anne McAuley on . Posted in Blogging, Projects & Press Releases

blog posts

Originally I was going to write 12 blog post in six days but that just wasn’t a reasonable goal. I updated to 12 posts in 12 days which is more attainable. 

I need a challenge.

Not an income challenge. I already did that Q1 when I exceeded my income goals three months in a row and running. It seemed like a good idea until a I realized I was also planning my wedding. It was a crazy time. Thankfully my supportive husband was with me every step of the way.

Not a client challenge. I’ve gotten the hang of nurturing leads so that when a client and I decide to no longer work together there are prospects waiting to work with me.

Not a physical challenge. I joined a gym in February. I am enjoying working off stress and sleeping better, not to mention the benefit of my clothes fitting better.

I need a blogging challenge.

Why I am Writing 12 Blog Posts in Six 12 Days

Clients approach me with an understanding that content is important to their marketing and social media strategy but don’t have time to write. That’s when they hire me for a 12 post blogging package. Within 4-6 weeks we develop 12 blog post ideas that they can use as blog posts, newsletter content, and/or LinkedIn publishing.

I’ve never done a 12 post post blog project for my own website and it’s about time for that to happen! And I am going to do it in Six 12 DAYS!

Sounds crazy but the timing is perfect. I’ve wrapped up a few projects and am waiting for a few to start. I have ideas on lists all over my office, in my head, and on my computer.

To start, I am handpicking 12 blog post ideas that I’ve had rolling around in my head for a long time. This post is the first of 12.

If you’re thinking about creating content for your business blog, join us in the Blogging Badass Facebook group where we’re sharing our blogging tips and ideas.

Relevant Posts

15 Blog Post Ideas for Business

102 Blog Post Ideas

5 Blog Post Ideas for Business

Writer’s Block Tips for Bloggers

Are you paralyzed at the thought of writing a blog post? Read this. 

What NOT to do as a Professional Blogger

Written by Anne McAuley on . Posted in Blogging, Entrepreneur Tips

When I decided to become a professional blogger, I did it with my ass on fire and really had no idea what it meant to be a professional blogger or social media manager.

All I knew was that I had been laid off from corporate America and wanted to pursue my dream of being a writer. A dream, 14 weeks of severance, crash courses in blogging, social media, and networking, and I was ready (ish) to go.

Over the years I’ve offered a variety of writing services to my clients. The projects didn’t always turn out the way I wanted but I learned along the way.

Here’s what NOT to do as a professional blogger:

  1. Listen to the naysayers. I would have started a side gig before leaving corporate America if I had ignored a certain person at my corporate job. She told me I couldn’t make money blogging and I believed her. I never thought to do my own research or give it a try. I could’ve at least had a running start on a full-time business.
  2. Start without a plan. I know what you’re thinking — that I didn’t have a plan and I am okay. Yes, it’s okay but there are days when I wish I could go back in time and tell myself to get a j-o-b and start a side gig before jumping in full-time.
  3. Fail to have a strategy. I’ve spent A LOT of time spinning my wheels, doing what other people said I should be doing, and never had my own strategy. Whether it’s short or long term, you’ve got to plan where you’re taking your business. Once I did that, I was able to focus my efforts on social media and marketing, making the most of the time I spend on my business and on client work.
  4. Let clients dictate your pricing and packages. I thought it would be more sale-able to let clients tell me what they needed and then I could put a price on it. Boy was I wrong! Here’s the secret: clients don’t always know what they want. I ended up down a rabbit hole of projects and clients I didn’t want. Once I defined my pricing and packages, I was able to say, “Here is how I can help you and the cost.” It’s easier to tell someone that they didn’t fit what I offer and refer them to someone else rather than taking on work I didn’t really want to do.
  5. Assume people will do what they say. Last year I made the mistake of assuming a company was going to refer a certain amount of business to me so I didn’t fill my pipeline with leads. When they didn’t come through, I was left without the income and without any leads to fill the gap. Ouch. Lesson learned.
  6. Be afraid of change. If there is one thing I’ve learned as a professional blogger, it’s that change happens and you just have to ride the wave. When I started my business, I was a social media manager for most of my clients and blogged for a few. I discovered that blogging is a higher margin and, more importantly, I enjoy it more so that’s where my business is focused now. It was an interesting shift but well worth it in the end.

Even without a plan to start my life as a blogger, I’ve been able to learn, grow, and change along the way. Are you interested in becoming a blogger? Do you want to start a blog on your business website? Schedule a Getting Started Session today by calling 480-206-6452 or email anne@annemcauley.com.

My Experiment on the Best Times To Post on Social Media

Written by Anne McAuley on . Posted in Blogging, Content Marketing

My social media strategy was stale. I needed to revamp and refocus my efforts.

Since 2010 I’ve been researching and experimenting using social media for business. When I began, the strategy was simple – have a presence on social media – but it has gotten more complicated, not to mention more crowded. While Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn remain my steadfast platforms, there are a lot more players on the scene that need consideration — Pinterest, Instagram, Periscope and more.

best times to post on social mediaOver the years, I’ve studied the return on social media investment, target marketing, and best times to post. While I’ve dabbled in the latest news on these topics, I’ve primarily stuck to the beat of my own drummer.

I post what I think my social media communities think is helpful, amusing, or engaging and it’s worked to get me visibility, networking contacts, leads, and clients.

BUT

The landscape of social media is changing. It’s significantly more crowded, making it more challenging than ever to get my brand’s voice heard.

I suspected my content was not the problem but  rather it was the times of day I was posting – Monday through Friday, primarily during business hours. That’s when I came across the Co-Schedule download called The Ultimate Best Times to Post on Social Media and confirmed my suspicions.

Rather than paying attention to the day or time, I was posting whenever the mood struck me. That’s not necessarily when my community was online so even if the content was good, they weren’t seeing it or paying attention to it.

What did I do to adjust the times I was posting to social media?

For the better part of the year I was paying for the Awesome access on social media scheduler Buffer but I wasn’t always using it consistently. Even when I was, I hadn’t adjusted the time zone or posting times in months. That alone could help me but I decided to follow CoSchedule’s guidelines for time zone and best times to post on social media for Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn, my primary social media platforms.

When I started my experiment I had:

Twitter – 2880 followers

Facebook Blogging Badass Page – 620 likes

Facebook Blogging Badass Group – 107 members

LinkedIn – 718 connections, 802 followers

Goals of the Experiment

  1. Schedule one month of posts on Buffer.
  2. Add live posts at various days and times.
  3. Use the same posting times for Facebook page and group.
  4. 3,000 Twitter followers
  5. Increase engagement in the Blogging Badass Facebook group.
  6. Engage with target market on LinkedIn.

Honestly, I am surprised at the results of the best times to post on social media experiment. By the numbers, here’s where I ended the month:

Twitter – 2975 followers <+95>

Facebook Blogging Badass Page – 619 likes <-1>

Facebook Blogging Badass Group – 114 members <+7>

LinkedIn – 728 connections <+10>, 815 followers <+13>

Overall I feel like I spent less time on social media and got better results

but

the numbers aren’t the whole story of the best times to post on social media.

There were two surprises.

The first was the increase of 95 Twitter followers with little effort. The newest followers are aligned with my target markets of SEO and marketing companies, content creators, digital marketers, and fellow bloggers. I think that the times and consistency of tweets has helped as well as participating in twitter chats with complementary businesses, retweeting, live tweeting, and making strategic connections.

The second surprise was on LinkedIn. Not only did the number of connections and followers increase, there was more engagement on my posts. It is worth noting that along with adjusting the times, I made an effort to comment on posts by people in my target market. That got me seen by more people including two new clients.

Interestingly, during this experiment I didn’t publish on LinkedIn or my blog. I only recycled content I had already created and shared the best of what I found from others.

What can be learned from this experiment?

I learned that with focused effort and strategy I can grow my business and increase engagement in my online communities – and you can too.

  • Identify your target market.
  • Choose social media platforms where your target market spends time.
  • Create and share your own content.
  • Share the best content from others.
  • Post relevant content at times when your community is most likely to see it.

Was the CoSchedule guide the key to the success of my experiment on the best times to post to social media? Yes but…. so was Buffer …. and so was the kickass content I created ….and so was the kickass content I found and shared. The real lesson is realizing that while I’ve learned a lot about social media in the last five years, there’s a lot more to learn.

Are you interested in learning how to use social media as part of your blogging strategy? Join the Blogging Badass Facebook group

Source: The Ultimate Best Times to Post on Social Media

I blogged for free and it sucked. But that was my fault.

Written by Anne McAuley on . Posted in Blogging

Over the last year I’ve received requests to write for other blogs or to mention other brands in my blog posts. None of them had ever been the right fit until recently.

I was asked to write a post about staying inspired when your freelance business is slow. It seemed like a good fit for my project site The Solopreneur Blog. They agreed.

blogging for freeI wrote the post.

I seamlessly weaved mentions of their brand into the post.  

I included their infographic as they had requested.

I blogged for free and it sucked. 

But that was my fault. 

I forgot to ask, “What’s in it for me?”

I never negotiated payment.

I didn’t ask for a certain number of social media mentions.

I asked for nothing and I received pretty close to that.

Since the post was published, I’ve received one mention on Twitter. That’s it.

I tweeted a link to the post out more times than the brand I wrote the post for and that sucks.

I had faith they would do what lesser brands have done for me which is to promote the post but I never explicitly asked for that.

Thanks to my experience I am now a better negotiator.

And I won’t blog for free anymore.

I emailed them this morning to let them know I am writing this post. Without a response, I will remove the post from The Solopreneur Blog. I am waiting to see how or if they respond to my email. 

Are you receiving requests to write articles but you’re not a writer? I can help. Call me at 480-206-6452 or email anne@annemcauley.com.

6 Things I Learned by Being a Facebook Business Page Failure

Written by Anne McAuley on . Posted in Content Marketing

I’ve been trying to delete my Facebook business page but I haven’t pulled the plug yet and here’s why. I was a Facebook failure.

Like a lot of people, I was frustrated that posts weren’t being seen and that I wasn’t getting leads from Facebook. What I really needed was to be more engaging to connect with my target audience. Once I realized Facebook is a place to network and not a place for leads (at least not as a primary focus), I decided not to kill my page.

Here are six things I learned by being a Facebook business page failure.

  1. Don’t sell on the personal profile. This is more of a pet peeve than a lesson learned from my own experience. While it’s okay to comment and tag your business on your personal profile, don’t sell on your personal profile. Not only will you alienate friends and family, Facebook will shut you down.
  2. Facebook business pageKnow your target client. I don’t mean you sit around and hold hands singing Kumbaya. I mean you need to know who you want to reach. As soon as I figured that out, my social media focus changed. Facebook was no longer the only platform on which I engaged; I began using other social networks and engaged differently on Facebook. I participated in groups and even created my own. Before I could blink, I had over 100 people in my Blogging Badass Facebook group and more engagement on my business page than I had seen in months. And I was actually spending less time on Facebook.
  3. You want to use Facebook to generate leads. Everyone loves a pipeline of leads but Facebook isn’t a lead generator. I changed my Facebook strategy in favor of LinkedIn. The reason? My ideal clients include other businesses and professionals who are likely networking on LinkedIn, not Facebook. They go to Facebook to see their family, not make business contacts.
  4. You’re too focused on why people unliked your page. Two words for people who unlike your page: who cares. I used to ponder why someone would unlike my page and even tried to figure out who they were. It really doesn’t matter. In fact, I think it’s more focused now than ever.  
  5. You aren’t engaging in your own or anyone else’s groups. If you’re too focused on yourself, you’re not connecting with others. Once I engaged my audience by asking and answering more questions on my page and in groups, I experienced a shift. Facebook isn’t about me, it’s about engaging and connecting to the audience whether that’s on my own pages and groups or those of others. I recommend a combination of both.
  6. You’re all words, no graphics. As a writer, I want to share my words but I never thought about graphics until my Facebook engagement was next to nothing. Graphics were foreign to me until I started watching my blogger friends’ pages and saw they were using graphics to engage their audience! I finally bit the bullet and learned how to use Canva to create simple images for my blogs and social media. Guess what? Engagement on the Blogging Badass Facebook business page and in the Blogging Badass Facebook group are higher than ever!

While I still have days when I want to delete my Facebook business page, it’s not a constant nagging feeling. I’ve found ways to engage my audience and connect with my target clients. It’s good to not be a Facebook failure any more!

If you’re not sure which social media sites are right for you, call me at 480-206-6452 or email anne@annemcauley.com to schedule a Content Strategy Session today.

Why Your Business Needs a Blog

Written by Anne McAuley on . Posted in Blogging, Content Marketing

If you have a blog on your website and aren’t adding content on a consistent schedule, you’re missing a piece of your marketing plan and an opportunity to speak to your target client. A blog is the most affordable way to establish yourself as an expert and distinguish yourself from the competition.  Not to mention that Google loves new, relevant content; it helps the site get ranked higher in searches.

When was the last time you added content to your website?

Many businesses have websites designed only to leave it hanging on the internet. We don’t have time or don’t know what to write for the blog. It’s overwhelming and with all of the other hats we wear as business owners, blogging often falls to the bottom of the list. And we never reach the end of the list.

What kind of content should be on a blog?

When I think of blogging, I think about adding written posts but in an age of insta-technology, many people don’t want to read a long written article.

The goal is to connect YOU to your target audience.

Videos, podcasts, infographics, news about your business, community events (if you’re targeting a particular geographic area), links to guest blog posts or media clips all make for effective content for your business blog.

Often we share other people’s content and while that’s a good idea, there is great opportunity to share your own products. Make a video about how to wear the scarves you sell. Write about tips for decorating and include your products in the post. Make your target clients want to buy your products.

Don’t stop when you hit publish.

Share blog posts on social media and in e-newsletters. Share the link to the post more than once and across social media sites using a different message each time. Not only will you drive traffic to your website, you will be establishing yourself as an expert in your field.

It’s time to start blogging for business.

If you’re not sure how to get started or continue blogging, join the Blogging Badass Facebook group and grab a copy of the Badass Guide to Blogging

Let’s Talk!

480.206.6452

info@mcauleyfreelancewriting.com